Vancity screening ‘On Corporate Graffiti’

On Thursday, August 30, the Vancouver Public Space Network is presenting an awesome collection of short films about public art, advertising, city hacking and other urban public space issues. Not to ruin the surprise or anything, but one of those short films is my documentary On Corporate Graffiti!

VIDEO: A takeaway jam

For many of the musicians I know, band practice is an intimate weekly ritual. One member taps out a rhythm overheard on the bus, while another articulates some severely internet-centric lyric. Sometimes it’s all lighbulbs and fireworks. Other times ideas are ridiculed and abandoned as quickly as they’re expressed.

The Adulthood graciously shared a jam session with me, and even let me point a camera at their faces. When I stopped by, they were jamming out a new song called ‘Til Death do us Part. This is the resulting video/jam/document/thing.

Here Come the Video­freex

It’s a trailer for a documentary that aims to restore tapes from a countercultural video collective called the Videofreex. This gang of young New York artists was originally hired by CBS in ’69 to capture important moments in the youth movement. CBS didn’t like their stuff (too radical!) so they went on to start North America’s first pirate TV station.

Artist Fiel dos Santos welds arms into art

VIDEO: Arms into Art

At the world-renowned artist studio Núcleo de Arte in Maputo, Mozambican artist Fiel dos Santos recalls a childhood robbed by military struggle.

“I grew up in civil war,” says Santos, who was 5 years old when his country became embroiled in a conflict that would last 16 years. “In my area the rebels were coming two times a week, every month, every day — but I’m here.”

"Bingu okays newspaper ban law," Daily Times March 1, 2011

Media Council weighs options on Malawi’s media ban law

Media Council of Malawi (MCM) says if dialogue with government doesn’t end in a repeal of Section 46 of Malawi’s Penal Code, it will consult legal experts to see if the media ban law can be challenged on constitutional grounds.

The renewed call to repeal Section 46, which empowers the Minister of Information to ban publications deemed contrary to the public interest, was in response to a government statement by Chief Secretary Bright Msaka that said the law would only be used under “reasonable grounds.”